Heading to Vegas: NAB Show 2013

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I am heading to Las Vegas for the NAB Show. I don’t go every year, but do enjoy going, as it is far more diverse than many shows and conferences we all go to. I am not a professional, but rather a poor excuse for an amateur when it comes to digital images and video, but it is always fun to see what the pros use.

I am hoping to get a few minutes to check out some of the new POV camera and maybe some lenses for the Nikon. With a lot of the vendor floor focused on content creation and manipulation, data storage issues are not going to ease up any time soon.

I have been looking through some of the announcements and email blasts from vendors going to NAB, whether just in a booth or presenting in a session. While not as flashy a topic as some of the others, there is going to be a noticeable amount of conversation about Big Data. The topics seem to break into two primary categories, analytics and data storage.

With multiple ways people consume content today combined with numerous social network channels, the opportunity to learn about consumer preferences is high. I think the number of questions that can be analyzed are endless. Things like "Can key influencers in niche markets be identified to help promote targeted productions?" or "What are the most effective cross promotion programs?" can benefit from big data analytics.

On the storage side of big data, Media and Entertainment is one of the industries at the forefront of the unstructured data explosion. I can get a GoPro camera that shoots in 4K now so I might be experiencing a small version of these challenges. More beyond high definition content is being generated, then throw 3D into the mix and traditional storage methods are being stretched.

We should see some new storage products running next generation file systems, more advanced data management continued expansion of data tape storage and some conversations about object based storage. Organizations are approaching file counts that exceed traditional management.

I hope I see some interesting things that I can talk about when I get back.